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A Child's Life - Japan

In Japan, children are treated with the utmost care and attention. The literacy rate in Japan ranks among the world's highest, and the infant mortality rate is among the lowest. Despite its population density and astronomical cost of living, Japan provides excellent 'quality of life' for its children.

In Japan, children are treated with the utmost care and attention. The literacy rate in Japan ranks among the world's highest, and the infant mortality rate is among the lowest. Despite its population density and astronomical cost of living, Japan provides excellent 'quality of life' for its children.

In Japan, children are treated with the utmost care and attention. The literacy rate in Japan ranks among the world's highest, and the infant mortality rate is among the lowest. Despite its population density and astronomical cost of living, Japan provides excellent 'quality of life' for its children. One of Japan's most honored traditions is the Omikoshi Matsuri, the annual Shinto festival. Nearly every Shinto shrine in Japan holds a mikoshi parade, in which a miniature replica of the shrine containing an image of the honored deity is transported through the surrounding streets on the shoulders of local patrons. One of Japan's most honored traditions is the Omikoshi Matsuri, the annual Shinto festival. Nearly every Shinto shrine in Japan holds a mikoshi parade, in which a miniature replica of the shrine containing an image of the honored deity is transported through the surrounding streets on the shoulders of local patrons. Depicted here is a youthful version of a traditional mikoshi parade. Uniforms seem to offer the people of Japan a sense of purpose and belonging. School children, public servants, and even the majority of private business employees all wear them with pride.

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  • Image © 2002 Robert George
A story told with photos.

Published on 12/18/02

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